YAWN

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YAWN

Young and Wealthy but Normal. Self-made wealthy young persons (usually under 35) who live fairly simply. That is, YAWNs tend not to buy fancy cars and houses, but rather work hard and spend time with their families. YAWNs contrast with yuppies, who embrace their wealth rather more ostentatiously. It can be difficult to market products to YAWNs, though some are noted for their philanthropy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In another experiment, the participants were given the same instructions; however, the researchers also applied electrical currents to the people's scalps, which were meant to stimulate the motor cortex, the part of the brain that controls yawning.
Contagious yawning is triggered involuntarily when we observe another person yawn -- it is a common form of echophenomena -- the automatic imitation of another's words (echolalia) or actions (echopraxia).
Padala; A Case of Excessive Yawning With Citalopram; Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry.
Although age was the most important predictor of contagious yawning, only 8% of the variation in whether or not a participant yawned was explained by their age.
But Elizabeth Cirulli, author of the latest study and assistant professor at Duke University School of Medicine, says: "The lack of association in our study between contagious yawning and empathy suggests that contagious yawning is not simply a product of one's capacity for empathy.
Another theory, of course, is that yawning seems to be contagious.
Researchers used a standard definition of yawning to distinguish it from non-yawn mouth opening.
Study co-author Nadja Reissland, a psychologist at Durham University, said that they still do not know what importance and function the yawning of a fetus carries.
In total there were 480 instances where one person yawning triggered yawns in another within three minutes.
Theory one is that yawning is a fixed action pattern that may be set off by the stimulus of seeing someone else yawn; theory two, sometimes known as the 'chameleon effect', is that contagious yawning is caused by an unconscious tendency to mimic the mannerisms of a companion; theory three is that it is caused by a feeling of empathy towards the other yawner.
Contagious yawning in humans happens because of the inherent trait of empathy.
It describes yawning as an ideal model for understanding a transitional behaviour and its relevance in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, ontogenesis, phylogenies and social cognition.