YAWN

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YAWN

Young and Wealthy but Normal. Self-made wealthy young persons (usually under 35) who live fairly simply. That is, YAWNs tend not to buy fancy cars and houses, but rather work hard and spend time with their families. YAWNs contrast with yuppies, who embrace their wealth rather more ostentatiously. It can be difficult to market products to YAWNs, though some are noted for their philanthropy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
To quote Robert Provine, a pioneer on yawning research, yawning may have the dubious distinction of being the least understood, common human behaviour.
"Did someone capture Sarfaraz yawning," one fan tweeted.
Nobody knows why yawning seems to be contagious but some ideas include empathy, imitation and an increased need for oxygen when a nearby person takes too much.
Lest we think this is a humans-only phenomenon, contagious yawning is also a hallmark of chimpanzees and a group of primates known as Old World monkeys.
The researchers observed 36 adults, who were made to watch videos of another person yawning. They measured the participants' brain activities during the experiment through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
Hence excessive or intractable yawning has to be kept in mind while prescribing the so called most safe anti-depressant class of medication, the SSRIs, in this case fluoxetine.
Excessive yawning also may be related to epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors.
Autism and schizophrenia sufferers are reportedly less able to catch yawns, researchers said, so understanding the genes that might code for contagious yawning could illuminate new pathways for treatment.
They say their findings show that contagious yawning may decrease with age, and that it is also not linked with tiredness or energy levels.
"Our findings are consistent with the view that contagious yawning ...
Other people believe that yawning is a protective reflex to redistribute the oil-like substance called surfactant that helps keep lungs lubricated inside and keeps them from collapsing.
Researchers used a standard definition of yawning to distinguish it from non-yawn mouth opening.