YAWN

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YAWN

Young and Wealthy but Normal. Self-made wealthy young persons (usually under 35) who live fairly simply. That is, YAWNs tend not to buy fancy cars and houses, but rather work hard and spend time with their families. YAWNs contrast with yuppies, who embrace their wealth rather more ostentatiously. It can be difficult to market products to YAWNs, though some are noted for their philanthropy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the study 328 participants were shown a three-minute video showing other people yawning.
Contagious yawning occurs not only in humans, but also in chimpanzees and other animals, in response to hearing about, seeing or thinking about yawning.
The fancier term for stretching and yawning is "pandiculation.
Other people believe that yawning is a protective reflex to redistribute the oil-like substance called surfactant that helps keep lungs lubricated inside and keeps them from collapsing.
While it is well known that foetuses open and close their mouths, experts have disagreed over whether or not they are actually yawning.
However, yawning has never been determined this clear.
Participants were divided up into "triggers" - who instigated yawning - and "observers" who responded by yawning themselves.
Research has shown that between 40 and 60 per cent of people are prone to contagious yawning and 33 per cent of chimpanzees will yawn back at humans.
It describes yawning as an ideal model for understanding a transitional behaviour and its relevance in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, ontogenesis, phylogenies and social cognition.
Senju's students reported that he and his dog shared many a yawn, but no one had rigorously tested contagious yawning between species.
It would also suggest that yawning has nothing to do with boredom.
Although yawning is widespread in many animals, contagious yawning - a yawn triggered by seeing others yawning - has previously only been shown to occur in humans and chimpanzees.