X

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X

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol indicating that listing is a mutual fund.

X

1. A symbol appearing next to a stock listed on NASDAQ indicating that the share being traded is a mutual fund. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if an X or XD follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the share was a mutual fund.

2. A symbol appearing next to a stock indicating that the stock is being traded without its next dividend. This occurs when the company the stock represents declares that the next dividend is coming to the seller before he/she decides to sell it. A buyer purchasing such a stock begins to receive dividends the next time they are declared.

x

Used in stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a stock that trades ex-dividend or ex-rights: Gencp x212.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Crown accepted the defendant's plea that he had "recklessly" grabbed X's neck.
A prominent link leads visitors directly to Wiley X's Tactical Site dedicated to the needs of soldiers, police officers, fire fighters and others who need state-of-the- art APEL, Ballistic-rated and ANSI vision protection, gloves and accessories.
After providing a CliffsNotes companion to X's biography in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 paints a picture of Oxford, Britain, and race that moves between 1870 and 1964.
Minaj's artwork for her single does not depict the truth of Malcolm X's legacy,'' Shabazz's statement said.
Beginning in the 10th year and ending with the 13th year, Sub-Y2 had a call option with respect to X's partnership interest, priced at fair market value.
The following day, Mrs X's condition deteriorated and she was referred to hospital.
The extra grunt and huge screen it's quad h ngine there e X's eb ker.
Birmingham parking patrols strike seven X's in place of the plate number, whenever any car is found parked illegally without license plates or at meters that are no longer valid.
See, those X's do not just mark a gruesome bit of history.
Se proponen indicadores de la calidad de las aproximaciones: a) variables y's bien explicadas por las x's, b) agrupaciones de variables y's cuyas estimaciones presentan fuertes correlaciones y c) subconjuntos de variables explicativas que presentan mayor correlacion con una variable y particular.
To say that "X believes A is B," when A is not B, is not to ascribe a mental state of false belief to X but to take a "semantic position," specifically that X's reasoning about A and B should be evaluated by a special validity criterion.
I regret that Title X's important role in achieving these remarkable results was not communicated clearly in the Foster article.