Hand

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Hand

A unit of length equivalent to four inches. It is used in the sale and use of horses.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But the one with the writing hand is our representation of ourselves.
He was writing with his right hand, and the documents were rearranged so that he could put his pen down and manipulate them with his writing hand, instead of using his free hand, as usual.
Star student David Hatton got 7 A* grades despite breaking his writing hand midway through his GCSE exams.
After relying largely on covers and songs written for them by other musicians as a Westlifer, Shane has had a writing hand in everything on his debut album, You and Me, which he will be performing at Symphony Hall, alongside some of the band's hits.
The questionnaire (1) started with some questions concerning personal characteristics (academic position, age, gender, nationality, scientific discipline, institution, and writing hand).
Attempts to switch the writing hand: relationships to age and side of hand preference.
She and her assistant discovered his writing hand was apparently hurting so much that he couldn't hold his pencil properly and described him holding the hand out with the fingers curled up.
John Grisham tries his experienced writing hand at a teen novel in Theodore Boone (10) when a lad, Theo, is the crucial link in a murder trial.
Writing left-handed on a notepad with a wire binding along the left hand edge (call me extravagant but I generally only write on one side of the page then flip it over) causes the writing hand to rub up and down on the wire binding.
1 1 No response to letters or phone calls: Put everything in writing Hand deliver a letter sking why there has been o response to previous orrespondence.
(106-07) Thus drawing upon French onomastics, Barthes exploits the surplus value of transcribing the sound [z] into two visual forms: either "s" or "z." The writing hand is willful in spelling the phoneme [z] as "s," instead of the commonly expected form of "z." The hand does not obey the rules of onomastics: it seems determined to manipulate the voice to its own preference.