work

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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in classic literature ?
The remaining poem, the "Melampodia", was a work in three books, whose plan it is impossible to recover.
When this work was accomplished, the miners resumed their picks and cut away the rock from underneath the wheel itself, taking care to support it as they advanced upon blocks of great thickness.
President Barbicane and the members of the Gun Club warmly congratulated their engineer Murchison; the cyclopean work had been accomplished with extraordinary rapidity.
In ten minutes more Jurgis had pulled off his coat and overshirt, and set his teeth together and gone to work.
He concentrated himself upon his work and upon how to save time, pointing out to Martin where he did in five motions what could be done in three, or in three motions what could be done in two.
About midnight in they came, dancing and skipping, hopped round the room, and then went to sit down to their work as usual; but when they saw the clothes lying for them, they laughed and chuckled, and seemed mightily delighted.
To make the Negro work, that is what his master did in one way and hunger has done in another; yet both these left Southern life where they found it.
Your hands are soft with the work others have performed for you.
When she retired at night, which the ailings and complaints of her grandmother seldom permitted before eleven, it was with a sense of weariness that began to destroy sleep; still the dear girl thought herself happy, for I more than equaled her expectations, and she had latterly worked on me with so much zeal as to have literally thrown the fruits of two weeks' work into one.
But was it not plain that the many men who did not work ate it all up?
The longer Levin mowed, the oftener he felt the moments of unconsciousness in which it seemed not his hands that swung the scythe, but the scythe mowing of itself, a body full of life and consciousness of its own, and as though by magic, without thinking of it, the work turned out regular and well-finished of itself.
Let us look to the great principle of gradation, and see whether Nature does not reveal to us her method of work.