Working Class

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Working Class

The class of persons who perform physical labor, skilled labor, domestic duties or similar tasks. Persons in the working class often earn an hourly wage and many (though far from all) have low job security. Examples of those with working class occupations include food servers, miners and construction workers. Some, though not all, are poorly paid. The working class is closely related to, but distinct from, the working poor. See also: Blue collar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unsurprisingly, the share of working-class people who receive benefits falls below that of lower-income people and above that of higher-income people, but the increase since 1998 is unique to the working class.
Just because working-class whites do not like the Left does not mean that they are the Right's natural constituency, especially a Right with a doctrinal commitment to free markets and minimal government.
Fifty years ago, children of working-class families could enter the middle class by going to state colleges and universities, where tuitions were low and even free for instate residents in California.
From the reinterpretation of Hidalgo and Juarez, Buffington moves to analysis of penny press efforts to write working-class men into the national narrative as active participants.
When the economy crashed in 2008, Obama won white unmarried women by a whopping 20 points (60 to 40 percent) and came within 6 points of winning white working-class women (47 to 53 percent), though he still lost white male working-class voters by 24 points and got only 37 percent of the white working-class vote.
Country music, as it turns out, is a surprisingly effective entryway into discussions of class, since it not only has its roots in the white working-class community, but is also seen as a symbol of the redneck by the dominant middle class.
Joanne Klein also has important things to say about generational change within the organization, with the Police Acts of 1890 and 1919 transforming policing from a casual working-class job into a skilled occupation with an educated and disciplined workforce but at the same time erecting barriers between different generations of policemen with different abilities and approaches (8-9, 114-121).
I hope that this working-class writing issue of World Literature Today serves you, our readers, as an introduction to the enormous range of contemporary, worldwide, working-class writing.
A country that created the music of white working-class alienation--heavy metal--now produces pop bands with middle-class pedigrees.
The only perceived difference was that middle-class recruits wore pyjamas in bed - working-class recruits did not
This essay aims to demonstrate that Pierre Bourdieu's study of working-class cultures, and especially the ambiguity in the semantics of disinterestedness that notoriously complicates his work, can be read against this habit of dichotomizing working-class practice along the lines of short-term pragmatic interests or a disengaged moral resistance.
But according to a new book published this month, the idea of a working-class hero has long since been replaced by a new breed of caricatures poking fun at the poorer classes and beamed on to our television screens.