work

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Work

1. To perform a task, especially in exchange for compensation or the potential for profit. Working is necessary for any economy to function.

2. See: Job.

work

see JOB, LABOUR, WORK ORGANIZATION, SOCIOLOGY OF WORK, HOMEWORKING, DOMESTIC LABOUR.

work

see JOB.
References in periodicals archive ?
Study participants were asked to indicate the extent to which they felt that a certain work of art was in accordance with a certain identity.
In any event, Wollheim queries in an assertive manner, `does it not look as though what it is for an artifact to be a work of art is for it to satisfy these reasons?
Problems begin to arise, though, if one thinks that the task of determining whether or not an artefact is genuinely or authentically a work of art is crucially different from the task of determining whether it is genuinely Zulu art or Baule art.
Students will closely observe and describe Warhol's Campbell's Soup Can and an actual Campbell's tomato soup can label, contrast and compare the image and object, explore criteria for determining if an image or object is a work of art, and justify reasons.
The IRS disallowed them, arguing that the viol was a work of art that would only increase in value and therefore was not depreciable.
It is only when the client purchases or commissions a work of art that a charge is incurred.
However, with God the Reveller in 1987, Hawkins introduced a more dynamic strain into his dances: "To be only Apollonian in a work of art," he said that year, "is academic.
The photos register moments of the action of moving about, painting, or drawing in the studio--not painting or drawing by traditional means, perhaps, but through actions that transform movements into a work of art.
Now the pendulum has swung so fully away from the philosophical to the social and economic that some scholars labor under the illusion that knowing about the patron of a work of art or about what the patron paid for the work explains everything.
The back-slats on the chairs are a work of art, and the table legs, instead of being four-sided, are five-sided with fluting and blind fretwork.
Neither the furniture as a work of art nor the background as a historical imitation gains from the juxtaposition.
Choose one or more of the following questions, and write about your chosen work of art.