Labor Force

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Labor Force

The portion of a population available for work. For example, if there are 10,000 people in a town including 2,000 children and 3,000 retirees and chronically ill persons, the labor force is the remaining 5,000. The labor force may or may not include unemployed persons who do not wish to work. The unemployment rate is determined by calculating the unemployed persons in the labor force, not the general population.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Without a work force educated and trained to perform in these fields, our economy would be imperiled to the point of disaster.
To maintain work force productivity at acceptable levels, new employees, should be at least equal to the average proficiency, as determined by the level set by indigenous or long-time U.S.
We're also involved in another joint initiative to establish Lane County as a Certified Work Ready Community, which would demonstrate our community's commitment to improving local work force talent, especially in the development of foundational skills - such as reading, math and locating information - as well as "soft skills," such as team work and problem-solving.
In continuing to work with enriching the work force, the AEDC plans "to see a continued strong international development in Arkansas," said Lenka Horakova, project manager for European global business development at the AEDC.
According to an article by the Society for Human Resources Management, government estimates state that nearly 550,000 employees, or one-third of the federal work force, will retire over the next five to seven years and, within the next 10 years, 60 percent of the government's work force will hit retirement age.
The company is planning to reduce its work force in Canada to 192 by eliminating about 72 positions.
Not for Very Long," Marshall Loeb pointed out that the work force will continue to shrink as baby boomers retire in great numbers.
Upholding those responsibilities requires firms to attract and retain a skilled work force, and ensure that they work in a safe and professional manner.
"Rural Maine is facing a significant work force development challenge," Fitzsimmons said.
In 2001, employment in these four sectors accounted for 16.2 percent of the total non-farm work force. In 2006, five years later, the employment in these four sectors had risen to 16.4 percent.
Researchers at the Employee Benefit Research Institute have published the new statistics in its report "Labor Force Participation: The Population Age 55 and Older," concluding that labor force participation for ages 55-64 is being driven almost exclusively by the increase of women in the work force. The data was compiled from the recent U.S.
The 66-year-old is part of the growing mature labor force that's chosen to continue working or to re-enter the work force upon retirement.