Word

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Word

Informal; an advertisement or a set of advertisements in succession. The term is most common in broadcasting. For example, a radio announcer may say, "And now a word from our sponsors."
References in classic literature ?
Some German words are so long that they have a perspective.
Pray, Emma," said he, "may I ask in what lay the great amusement, the poignant sting of the last word given to you and Miss Fairfax?
She tried to lay her head back in its old position; but as she spoke those words, her father caught her round the waist, forced her, before she was aware of it, to look him in the face -- and kissed her, with a sudden outburst of tenderness which brought the tears thronging back thickly into her eyes.
Yet the words of the Black One were coming to pass, for already it seemed we could hear the sound of the running of a white folk who should eat up the kingdom.
Such, in brief, were the words of the letter, words that made me set out at once without waiting any longer for reply or money; for I now saw clearly that it was not the purchase of horses but of his own pleasure that had made Don Fernando send me to his brother.
Well then, since words cannot explain the matter, I will try deeds, and will move gradually out of Lineland in the direction which I desire to indicate to you.
Morrel; "I will take the first conveyance I find, and hurry to Marseilles, whence I will bring you word how all is going on.
The letter was my first healing after a chance encounter and a sleepless night; and I print every word of it except the last
For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
But in Jerry's vocabulary, "Mister Haggin" possessed all the definiteness of sound and meaning that the word "master" possesses in the vocabularies of humans in relation to their dogs.
Serial stories, he found, were usually published in that weekly in five instalments of about three thousand words each.
As I had anticipated, when I came to a conclusion, and consequently allowed her an opportunity of saying a few words, she affected to be extremely shocked and surprised at hearing of the nature of her master's pursuits, and reproached me in terms of the most vehement and virtuous indignation for incurring the guilt of abetting them, even though I had done so from the very excusable motive of saving my own life.