Widow

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Widow

A woman whose husband has died. In many countries, widows are eligible for certain state benefits. Widows generally receive at least a portion of their husband's pension or other retirement plan. Likewise, a man whose wife has died is called a widower.

Widow

A woman who has not remarried following the death of her husband.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bradbury's detailed documentation of Montreal wives and widows is fascinating but what is slightly difficult is keeping track of what provides commonality in the stories of widowhood across a 45 year period.
With all this in mind, one can imagine the countless number of rituals, cleansings and purifications associated with death in Igbo culture and how they become a factor in their widowhood practices.
A newly widowed woman in "Place" waits for a massage in a spa as she has done many times before her widowhood.
Her research reveals, however, that the realities of widowhood for wives of master craftsmen diverged from these expectations, as they did from the experiences of widows socially and economically above and below them.
Overall, the association between widowhood and STD diagnosis was significant for men only from one-half to less than one year after the death of a spouse (1.
fiction FOOTSTEPS Katharine McMahon WHEN Helena's husband is suddenly killed she is faced not only with widowhood but also with a host of unanswered questions.
Drawing on data from Medicare databases, researchers studied about 373,000 elderly married couples in the United States from 1993 to 2002 and found that the mortality rate after widowhood was significantly elevated for both husbands and wives.
Because women live longer than men, widowhood is a very real possibility and the financial consequences of widowhood are serious.
Nadezhda is a happily married sociology professor whose world is turned upside down when her eccentric, stubborn 84-year-old father telephones and announces that after two years of widowhood he is soon to remarry.
The author also speculates about the lives of these women based on what we know about women's lives in their world: birth, education, marriage, childbearing, widowhood, and death, along with their evangelizing activities.
It covers technological considerations for educators who want to show clips in the classroom and provides an appendix that lists movies by topic, from abortion to widowhood.