Widow

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Widow

A woman whose husband has died. In many countries, widows are eligible for certain state benefits. Widows generally receive at least a portion of their husband's pension or other retirement plan. Likewise, a man whose wife has died is called a widower.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Widow

A woman who has not remarried following the death of her husband.
Copyright © 2008 H&R Block. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission from H&R Block Glossary
References in periodicals archive ?
The study of widowhood in terms of armed conflict started with historical studies focusing on World War One war widows (Kuhlman 2012) or memories from widows after the Vietnam War (Fitzpatrick 2011).
Furthermore, [[beta].sub.1] is significantly positive, indicating a heterogeneous widowhood mortality.
But even if one plans ahead for widowhood, things can go wrong, as one woman discovered.
In many socio-cultural studies, (19) widowhood has been presented as either liberational or restrictive, the latter especially for poorer classes.
Widowhood in Nepal can only be understood if one understands what it means to be a Hindu wife.
We want to laugh, learn, and be inspired as we celebrate women everywhere who are thriving as they transition through divorce and widowhood. Wildflower Group is dedicated to providing both vital resources and a new community of support for women when they are feeling alone and most vulnerable," said Wildflower Group founder, Joan Rogliano.
The wills reflect the hardships and early death that beset frontier life, including the common occurrences of widowhood and child mortality.
Help them to see that adults can live alone and remain competent, and that her widowhood has not changed her into anything less.
Divorces often leave women poor in old age as in some cases does widowhood.
In addition to female genital mutilation, crimes committed in the name of so-called honour, forced and child marriage, and polygamy, recommendations also highlight other harmful practices, such as virginity testing, binding, widowhood practices, infanticide, and body modifications, including fattening and neck elongation.
Set in a small town in County Wexford, Ireland, in the early 1970s, it is the story of a mother navigating the first, tentative days and months of a premature widowhood.
It could also be due to the emotional support and care they receive from outside that network trumps the widowhood effects they see in other conditions.