Widower

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Widow

A woman whose husband has died. In many countries, widows are eligible for certain state benefits. Widows generally receive at least a portion of their husband's pension or other retirement plan. Likewise, a man whose wife has died is called a widower.

Widower

A man who has not remarried following the death of his wife.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anyone who is interested in dating widowers can easily create a profile on this website at Datingawidower.
The club's success has attracted the interest of other widows and widowers from nearby villages and towns willing to set up similar clubs in their neighborhoods.
The author's deft use of a symbolic-interactionist approach gives readers a sense of the meanings that these widowers derived and created concerning the deaths of their wives.
Father-of-two Alec McFadden, from Wallasey, had been battling to get back payment of benefits denied to him and thousands of widowers across the country.
Roshan Khan, a partner in Cardiff-based Loosemores solicitors, who acted for Mr Hooper and other widowers who were linked to his case, said: 'This ruling has put us back to square one.
Air Force Village is a life-care community in San Antonio for retired officers, spouses, widows or widowers and family members.
However, some authors have focused their attention directly or indirectly on older men, such as Sheehy (1998) Understanding Men's Passages, Levinson (1978) The Seasons of a Man's Life, Thompson (1994) Older Men's Lives, Kosberg and Kaye (1997) Older Men: Special Problems & Professionals Challenges, Moore and Stratton (2002) Resilient Widowers, Brothers (2001) The Abuse of Men, Lund (2001) Men Coping with Grief, Kramer and Thompson (2002) Men as Caregivers, Pritchard (2001) Male Victims of Elder Abuse, and Diamond (1997) Male Menopause.
It is widely known that older widowers and older men in general have fewer social supports or a smaller social network than older widows and older women (Barker, Morrow, & Mitteness, 1998; Krause & Keith, 1989; Lansford, Sherman, & Antonucci, 1998; Mor-Barak, 1997).
The basic standard deduction for married taxpayers filing jointly and qualifying widowers has increased to $9,500 (twice that of single fliers).
There are many widows and widowers who, if they get married, will lose pension and/or health care benefits left to them by their de ceased spouse.
I am pleased that we can now provide healthcare benefits to some veterans' widows or widowers who remarry and, in doing so, bring them peace of mind.
In another blow, widows and widowers - even those whose pensioner partners died during the "gross delay" in settling claims - are to get only half the entitlement.