Widow

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Widow

A woman whose husband has died. In many countries, widows are eligible for certain state benefits. Widows generally receive at least a portion of their husband's pension or other retirement plan. Likewise, a man whose wife has died is called a widower.

Widow

A woman who has not remarried following the death of her husband.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is worth noting, for example, that the two widowed ladies discussed earlier were identified with their full names and titles.
Unorthodox as it may seem, seeing The Widow's Tears as offering the wish-fulfillment fantasy of a wealthy widow-marriage goes a long way towards settling the critical debate over whether the play condemns the women's "fall" from widowed chastity or presents it as a fortunate fall into self-knowledge, breaking life-denying societal restrictions to acknowledge human sexual needs.
Lopata's (1973) widowed subjects in poverty appeared to be unable to afford the expenses of engaging in a social relationship.
My own case is as follows: I have been widowed seven and a half years; left with a house on mortgage; burdened with all maintenance, extortioniate rates etc irrespective of the fact that I live alone.
In countries embroiled in conflicts, women are often widowed young and must bear the heavy burden of caring for their children amid fighting and displacement with no help or support.
Widowed at the age of 24 with children aged 6 months and 2 1/2 years, Alberta Hagerty never remarried and supported her family as a teacher.
The last section presents the proprieties of the widowed estate and ends with Erasmus's early eulogy of his first patron, the widow Berta Heyen.
In light of the new findings, Siegel suggests that churches, temples and community organizations consider developing aggressive outreach programs offering emotional support to widowed men after the death of a family member.
At the end of the India-Pakistan War of 1971, thousands of widowed womenere left to fend for themselves.
Here is her latest personal ad in the monthly Senior Voice: ``JWWF (Jewish white widowed female), honest, attractive, ISO (in search of) happy, healthy and physically fit soul mate, 65-75 to give me back my life.
Since widowed men were more likely to marry and unmarried men more likely to hire a female servant than women to hire a male one, it seems clear that "men were at least as dependent on women's labour as the reverse" (195).