mouse

(redirected from white-footed mouse)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to white-footed mouse: deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, Deer mice

mouse

a device used to move a pointer around a COMPUTER screen.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
As a next step in examining the white-footed mouse's role in Lyme disease's spread, Anthony Long, Ph.D., professor of ecology & evolutionary biology in the UCI School of Biological Sciences, worked with Barbour and other researchers on the complex task of determining the DNA letter sequence that makes up the animal's genome.
Phylogenetic analysis of a partial genome inferred that the virus had a most recent common ancestor with an NYV collected in 1994 from a white-footed mouse from Shelter Island, NY (3).
These interactions were dominated by a small rodent species, identified as likely deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) or white-footed mouse (P.
We used live-trapping and mark-recapture sampling in a robust design framework (Pollock, 1982) to estimate white-footed mouse population density across seasons and years.
The deer mouse is found further north while the white-footed mouse is rarely found north of the St.
The effects of botfly parasitism on a local population of white-footed mouse. Ecology.
Some species, such as the white-footed mouse, are particularly efficient at passing Bb to the ticks that bite them.
Upcoming fall titles from Bunker Hill will include "The White-Footed Mouse," a children's picture book from NPR commentator Willem Lange, and "The Swordfish Hunters," professor and museum curator Bruce Bourque's exploration of Maine's prehistoric swordfish-hunting tribe.
Relationships of the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus, and its associated fleas (Siphonaptera) in southwestern Wisconsin.
Andrew Spielman, Harvard School of Public Health's late entomologist and infectious disease specialist, deciphered the life cycle of the deer tick and the role of the white-footed mouse as a pathogenic reservoir for the bacteria, explaining the spread of babesiosis, which he called "Nantucket Fever" after its first appearance on Nantucket in 1969, and Lyme disease.
The detection of Borrelia DNA in tissues of a white-footed mouse captured in Massachusetts in 1894 indicates that Lyme disease may have existed in wildlife for over a century (Aguirree, 2009).
Both species of Peromyscus, the prairie deer mouse, mentioned above, and the woodland form, the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus, were taken at Goose Pond.