cell

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Related to white blood cell: White blood cell count

cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
They found a molecule present during inflammation that binds to white blood cells allowing them to pass from the bloodstream into the tissue and cause severe damage.
The head of the research team, Professor Chang Yong of the Department of Chemical Engineering, says the device can effectively isolate and remove white blood cells from any blood sample.
"For most people having chemotherapy, the white blood cell count doesn't drop until several days after their treatment when they are at home.
(1.) "Researchers Developing Smaller, More Cost-Effective White Blood Cell Counter," Newswise, April 12, 2018.
It is traditionally known as "cancer of the blood" where abnormal or very immature white blood cells take over the bone marrow which is where all types of blood cell are normally made.
To a certain extent, the performance of an automatic white blood cell classification system depends on a good segmentation algorithm for segmenting white blood cells from their background.
Editor's Note: A variety of white blood cell known as CD8CD28- was found to be the type of leukocyte in which decreased telomere length was associated with a significant increase in the risk of clinical illness.
Monocytes are the largest of the white blood cells. They quickly travel to infected areas where they develop into macrophages (which consume foreign material) and signal other immune cells to join.
The samples were taken from a database compiled between 1992 and 1997 at Children's Hospital in Boston, in which all children in the emergency department between the ages of 3 days and 89 days received a white blood cell count and blood culture if they had a fever greater than 38[degrees]C.
rhG-CSF functions within the body to stimulate production of more white blood cells, helping to reverse neutropenia so that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy can continue with as near to normal white blood cell counts as possible.
On admission, the patient's temperature was 99.6[degrees] F and his white blood cell count was 14,400/[mm.sup.3].