welfare


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Welfare

A generic term for many government assistance programs. In general, it refers to programs in which the government pays money to indigent and unemployed persons. However, it may include non-cash payments such as food stamps. It may or may not include a requirement that able-bodied persons on welfare attempt to find work. Welfare is very controversial. Proponents argue that it helps the persons least able to help themselves, while critics contend it encourages people not to work. See also: TANF, Dole.

welfare

that aspect of management concerned with the wellbeing, both physical and emotional, of employees. It is an umbrella term for a range of services and activities. HEALTH AND SAFETY (the regulation of working conditions) is probably the most important but is often managed separately from other welfare functions. Other welfare activities include the provision of canteens and social clubs, sports facilities, medical officers etc. Some organizations also provide counselling services to help individuals cope with, for instance, work-related stress.

The reasoning behind employer concern with welfare suggests that a contented workforce is likely to be more productive. Some employers also feel that it is a social obligation to their employees. Welfare activities usually come under the remit of the PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT function. In fact, in the UK the origins of personnel management lie in the concern to improve employee welfare felt by certain employers in the early years of the 20th century. See FRINGE BENEFIT, HUMAN RELATIONS. See also SOCIAL SECURITY.

References in periodicals archive ?
(iii) Advancing animal welfare knowledge globally through industry insights, bespoke research and partnerships for action.
He said that the Sanatzar was very important institution of Social Welfare Department for imparting vocational training to the women for their economic rehabilitation.
Population Welfare Programme Balochistan (2010-15)###5425.792###5,056.07###535.75###375.025
Prior to welfare reform, the literature found evidence of welfare abuse by immigrants (Borjas 1994).
While Haskins and Morales debate the pros and cons of welfare reform, a third writer argues that welfare reform has not gone far enough.
Weighing in on what he describes as a debate between convergence and divergence theories, Kasza claims that the case of Japan demonstrates that there is greater convergence of welfare policy than acknowledged in the literature.
The economists' map of welfare focuses on three essential features: individual welfare, social welfare, and the relationship between the two.
* a Child Welfare Secretariat to provide a focal point for standardizing provincial child welfare services where necessary.
In extant GWE authorities, the fact that a payment originates in the general welfare fund appears to be generally assumed (or at least the IRS must believe that this would be easy to verify), and thus this first prong is not discussed.
Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc.'s (BIVI) cattle marketing team, with the assistance of NKH&W Marketing Communications, addressed animal welfare issues at the 2004 World Ag Expo in Tulare, Calif.
In 1996, Congress passed and the President signed the Personal Responsibility, and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), or what has become known as welfare reform.