water table

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water table

The upper limit of the saturated area of the earth containing groundwater.The water table will be at varying depths depending on location and time of year.

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References in periodicals archive ?
It would allow to discriminate the quantity of water actually infiltrating into the ground and reaching both water tables. Second, the impact of pore pressure increase on deformation, especially at the vicinity of shear surfaces, still needs to be assessed.
"We aren't in near the trouble as the San Joaquin Valley and Paso Robles, where there are serious drops in water table levels.
The depth of ground water table was interpolated by using geostatistical method of ordinary kriging Method during the period of 1990 to 2013 for premonsoon and postmonsoon.The result indicate that the depth of water table more than 10 meter is extented upto 11 sqkm to 94 sqkm of study area during 1990 to 2013 in premonsoon but in post monsoon the depth of water table more than 10 meter is increses upto 4 sqkm to 125 sqkm.
Even though lowering water table is likely to accelerate nitrogen cycling, it is, however, difficult to predict the change in concentration of certain nitrogen compounds since different processes of N cycle are functioning simultaneously.
Investigation of the effect of different subsurface drainage systems on the water table components and water table depths were two of the main objectives of this pilot study considered in this paper.
" The water table has been going down by an average of 3 feet every year for the past three decades.
The patterns of relationship between soil moisture and water tables suggest that in addition to the absolute water table levels, several other factors affect soil moisture.
Analyses of one mammillary from the western Grand Canyon region suggest that when the deposit stopped growing some 17 million years ago, the water table stood about 1,160 meters above today's river level.
In the U.S., the Department of Agriculture reports that, in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas--three leading grain-producing states--the underground water tables have dropped by more than 100 feet.
Falling water tables are already adversely affecting harvests in some countries, including China, which rivals the United States as the world's largest grain producer.
Ditches improve crop production in poorly drained soils by rapidly removing surface water from fields and lowering water tables. Consequently, ditches can accelerate groundwater nutrient transport from fields to surface waters (Mozaffari and Sims 1994; Sallade and Sims 1997a, 1997b).