War babies

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War babies

Slang term for the stocks and bonds of corporations in the defense industry.

War Babies

Informal; a term for securities in the defense industry. Examples of war babies include stocks in arms manufacturers or ship-building companies. In or immediately before wartime, war babies tend to be market outperforms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data gathered during the fieldwork pointed to abandonment as the most common way mothers managed the birth of a war baby.
He ordered the revocation of Taylor's citizenship be set aside and declared that the 62-year-old war baby was indeed a Canadian citizen.
He added: "When you're a war baby from working class housing estate in Ballymena, you never expected that one day that you'd be going to the palace to accept an award like this.
War baby Mrs Stoker, who today celebrated her 90th birthday yesterday, remains proud that she was born at exactly 11 o'clock, on the 11th day, of the 11th month - the precise time and date marking the official end of the Great War.
You can watch a fascinating interview with film-maker Sandi Hughes where she talks about her life from war baby to proud, black, gay scouser.
As stories were swapped and memories stirred, Maureen Hart of Haltwhistle - herself a Gilsland war baby - looked on and smiled: "This is a very special day.
A million people died on that journey - I was a war baby.
I remember being out with them one day when we got a letter from home saying my mum had had a baby girl, a war baby.
Now, almost 60 years on, her family has contacted the Sunday Mercury to tell the full heartbreaking story - and to seek a reunion with the war baby whose identity is today unknown.
The reunion is part of the Haltwhistle Walking Festival, and organiser Maureen Hart of Haltwhistle - herself a Gilsland war baby -- said: "The total number attending is about 50, including relatives.
I used to say my dislike of anything at all sweet was because I was a war baby - well not quite but ration books were still being used - so sweets and chocolate were simply not available.
The post war baby boomer generation is under threat from a substance that many thought would have passed into history by now - asbestos.