waiver


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Waiver

A statement of the voluntary surrender of a right. For example, suppose a company provides customers a service that might be dangerous, such as bungee jumping. The company may require customers to sign a waiver relinquishing the right to sue the company for negligence if a problem occurs. This reduces the company's risk in the conduct of its business.

waiver

The voluntary relinquishment of a known right, remedy, claim, or privilege.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morais appealed, arguing that Procaccini's acceptance of the waiver form signed outside his presence contravened Rule 23(a)'s "open court" requirement.
The USCIS is already overworked and backlogged without the embassy adding to that workload by sending back approved provisional waivers for fraud based on overstaying decades ago.
The policy shift away from higher Medicaid spending will push many states to create new programs using the 1332 waivers. So far, there is no indication that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will limit the state's power by denying waivers.
* SEC staff members keep complete, public records of all waiver requests (formal and informal) and create a public database of all disqualified bad actors.
In Texas, the statutory form lien waivers make life a lot simpler, said Rebecca Hicks, Esq., of Dallas-based Hicks Law Group PLLC.
The waiver request must include the waiver form with the following supporting documentation:
According to the company, the purpose of the waiver solicitation was to enable the company to fully utilise its outstanding bond facility for accretive acquisition opportunities currently under evaluation.
This seemingly broad waiver allows nearly all types of negligence claims, but is limited by a subsequent section of the Act that lists 13 exceptions to the waiver.
The FAA is encouraging applicants to submit waiver requests at least 90 days prior to the desired commencement of the drone operation.
The health reform law sets additional limits--often described as "guardrails"--on what states can do under an ACA innovation waiver. States' changes may not result in less comprehensive coverage, less affordable coverage or fewer residents with coverage, and they must be budget neutral for the federal government.
This article exposes the potential of the waiver to further subsidiarity within the WTO.
"We know that a large majority of the students who have received the waiver have graduated," says Burne Stanley, who coordinates the tuition waiver program for the Massachusetts Commission on Indian Affairs.