Vote

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Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
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References in periodicals archive ?
People should abstain from voting rather than vote badly.
Sandy King, of Telescope Inc., the Los Angeles company that manages American Idol voting, told the magazine Broadcast and Cable that votes dialed at regular intervals indicate that the votes might have been machine-dialed.
Little wonder the idealist in him seeks a totally secure voting machine, a totally fraud-proof electoral process.
However, newly aware of the stakes, risks, and intellectual challenges associated with voting equipment, computer scientists and mathematicians specializing in encryption are now avidly taking part in the search for dependable and inviolable voting technology.
Of course, there's always the old technique of requesting an absentee ballot under an assumed name, which is essentially just repeat voting using the mail.
"Opening up the voting pool to a younger generation may inspire our generation to vote more often, and take part in democracy," he sags.
As You Sow is working to make the process of proxy voting easier for investors through the ProxyInformation.
Some legislators and elections officials insist that new restrictions on registering to vote or voting are necessary to eliminate "voter fraud." But the real crime is the disenfranchisement of eligible voters brought about by these restrictions.
"Women who were adults at that time had been socialized to believe that voting was socially inappropriate for women," says Susan J.
The Voting Rights Act is coming up for renewal in 2007.
Exactly one year ago the Humanist ran a story about the unreliability of electronic voting machines, noting that they are programmed with unsecure software and are inauditable because they leave no paper trail.