Vote

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Vote

To make a choice along with other parties asked to make the same choice. In business and finance, voting is most often associated with electing directors and setting company policies at the annual meeting of shareholders. In order to be able to vote under these circumstances, one must hold voting stock. The right to vote gives the holder of voting stock a great deal of control over the company. In democratic forms of government, voters elect politicians, who may promote certain business or financial policies as part of their platform. In turn, bodies of elected politicians often vote on proposed policies or programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
2000 vote: I voted Libertarian, for all the good it did me.
In August, a group comprised mostly of Republicans filed a suit claiming that people who were registering for the first time through a third party voter registration group, such as ACORN, should have to show IDs when they voted.
Such "low-propensity" voters, as Gonzalez calls them, typically have been registered for two years or less and may not have voted ever.
Copy page 5 in the October 16 Teacher's Edition and distribute so students can compare how their state voted in 2000 and in 1996.
The investment manager, in turn, voted with management in almost all cases.
Ron Paul (R-Texas), one of the 27 Republicans who voted against CAFTA, the vote-buying price tag may end up being $50 billion or more.
Otherwise, they must cast a provisional ballot; these are checked later to make sure no one has voted twice.
While some people voted more than once, others were barred from voting at all.
In 1960, 63 percent of the electorate voted in the Presidential election.
In the last six competitive presidential elections since the Kennedy-Nixon race in 1960, eight states voted all but once for the Democratic presidential candidate; 15 states did the same for the Republican candidate.
Obviously, we don't have the amount of assets that General Electric does, but in 1989, the first year that we voted our proxies entirely in-house, we voted about 325.