voluntarism

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voluntarism

the philosophy that the activities of organizations should be governed by their own codes of conduct rather than by the law. In INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS it refers to the widespread belief amongst both TRADE UNIONS and employers that the form and outcome of COLLECTIVE BARGAINING should be determined by themselves and not be subject to legal regulation. See LABOUR LAW.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much the same might be said for the Revolutionary War; yet any nation aspiring to voluntaristic, independent-minded, and republican values, as the Revolutionary alliance and Confederate States of America undoubtedly did, is bound to experience tensions and dissension--even violent dissension--during the chaos of war mobilization.
58] I have emphasised, too, that Phra Phor Pan's 'millennialism,' also centred on Ariya Mettaya, took the form of a voluntaristic philosophy of'active utopianism', which urged villagers to strive to become 'noble people' (ariyachon) but did not encourage messianic expectations or violence.
An important key to Federalist legitimacy has been just that gradual, voluntaristic, and even negatively phrased approach.
After all, following the epistemological propositions inspired by philosophers (Aristotle), particularly pragmatic philosophers and thinkers (such as James, Toulmin, and Tsoukas) it is not surprising to find that practitioners' collective knowle dge is comprehensive, in that it explains dynamic phenomena by using the concept of tension, reconciles deterministic and voluntaristic explanations and accepts dual effects.
She is willing to concede that, at least for most cases, the voluntaristic approach is acceptable and that punishment for a criminal act is warranted just in case that act is both voluntary and legally wrong, regardless of the agent's motive or character.
However, his formulation is perhaps too voluntaristic, suggesting that poetry magically offers up positions that are easily adopted, or not, just as the subject pleases.
He wants to replace welfare with a more economically productive, democratically participatory, flexible, voluntaristic, and spiritually uplifting alternative.
To begin with, civil society is in large part not as civil, democratic, tolerant, inclusive, pluralistic, voluntaristic and participatory as optimistic liberals would like to think.
But the voluntaristic role of "vows" and sacraments, for example, in both evangelical and institutional churches, is only briefly touched upon.
Thibodeau's spirituality requires neither ascesis nor purgation, and makes no normative claims, being ultimately more gnostic than voluntaristic.
In it, two understandings of "the people" coexist: the voluntaristic and the legal.
The curious feature of Pipes's account is that it manages to combine a highly voluntaristic explanation of October -- which ascribes to the Bolsheviks a virtually limitless capacity to achieve their ends -- with a deterministic account of Russian political culture which, in effect, rules out any outcome in 1917 other than an authoritarian one.