voluntarism

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voluntarism

the philosophy that the activities of organizations should be governed by their own codes of conduct rather than by the law. In INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS it refers to the widespread belief amongst both TRADE UNIONS and employers that the form and outcome of COLLECTIVE BARGAINING should be determined by themselves and not be subject to legal regulation. See LABOUR LAW.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
This is where Stirner's primacy of the 'I' intersects with Nietzsche's voluntaristic 'will to power' over oneself.
A comparison of the shift towards decentralised bargaining in manufacturing provides a useful illustration of how the voluntaristic framework in Denmark involved a different set of processes and outcomes from the more legalistic model approach in Australia.
Voluntaristic emphasis upon the freedom of the will brings me to a second historical tendency decisive for the eclipse of substantive theories of practical reason: the ossification of neoscholastic natural law theory.
The main lesson, to repeat, is to avoid voluntaristic errors by coming to better understand what can, and what cannot, be changed by purposeful action.
Thus, the feeling of Goffman's second ethnography was very different from his first, with its clear allegiance to Parsons' voluntaristic theory of action.
Because the theory presented is not "coercive" in terms of Carneiro's dichotomy, it is necessarily "voluntaristic." That is the only other possibility.
As Siedentop argues, this voluntaristic shift, together with the movements toward equality, popular sovereignty, natural rights, and parliamentary representation, formed exactly the foundation modern liberalism needed to get started.
We may juxtapose these involuntary forms of poverty with the voluntaristic poverty of the ascetic, who renounces worldly luxuries of his own free will.
Nesbit would deny it, as did Cornel West in his classic The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism (1989), in which he stressed Dewey's reconciliation of the "voluntaristic, amelioristic, and activistic" Emersonian tradition with the historical consciousness cultivated in nineteenth-century Europe.
Since this revitalization is to be carried out by the members of the lifeworld, the decolonization is only possible through their communicative action, moral discourse, and voluntaristic movement to promote their shared values and visions.
This new community is based on voluntaristic Christian moral principles, not on greed or selfishness.
Both its fabled 'positivity' and its quickness to blame arise from a comfortingly voluntaristic conception of politics, in which Scotland's problems can be attributed to malign foreign institutions that are wilfully frustrating the natural genius of its people.