Cord

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Cord

A unit of volume used to measure quantities of firewood in Canada and the United States. The cord is equivalent to 3.62 cubic meters.
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According to a detailed report published Market Research Future (MRFR), by the Global Vocal Cord Paralysis Market is expected to value at USD 2920.2 Million by 2024, growing at a 3.8% CAGR from 2018 to 2023.
Caption: Voice disorders can result from a number of problems affecting the vocal cords, larynx (voice box) and other structures in the throat and elsewhere.
After the arytenoid release procedure was performed in the left side, the mucous membrane of vocal cord showed pliable compared to the opposite cord and eligible for an exoeSL procedure.
Vocal cords are histologically composed of surface epithelium, lamina propria, and muscular layers.
To date, only five cases of vocal cord paralysis following spinal or epidural anaesthesia have been documented to our knowledge.
Vocal cord paralysis (VCP) can result from processes that alter normal function of recurrent laryngeal nerve or vagus nerve.
Vocal cord hematoma generally appears on the left vocal fold; this is typically related to right-sided insertion of the orotracheal tube and left-handed hold of the laryngoscope (10).
Other causes of VCP like traumatic or forceps delivery, mediastinal surgery, and ligation of patent ductus arteriosus, brainstem anomalies, and intracranial bleeding were not present in our case, and hence the diagnosis of idiopathic congenital bilateral vocal cord paresis was made.
We also hypothesized that in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis the quality of voice and speech is significantly lower compared to the healthy subjects.
Flexible laryngoscopy revealed large bilateral vocal cord polyps causing almost complete airway obstruction.
A fibronasolaryngoscopy showed arythenoidal and vocal cord edema (ventricular bands) with incomplete left vocal cord abduction.
There were 22 cases (44%) of polypoid lesions, 16 cases (32%) of vocal nodules, single case (2%) of true cyst of vocal cord, 3 cases (6%) of Reinke's edema, 4 cases of cysts, and a single case each of posttraumatic granuloma, laryngopyocele, papilloma, hemangioma, and laryngeal sporidiosis.