deficit

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Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contact with a doctor within the month preceding the survey in both sexes, age, history of stroke, visual deficit in men, and incompetence in toileting in women were significantly associated with falling.
It is likely that the decrease that was observed both when stimuli were two distinct matrices (multiple and integration conditions) and when the number of targets increased was a direct consequence of the increased complexity of the configurational set, rather than of the presence of a visual deficit; similar effects were reported with sighted individuals who were tested on comparable tasks (Vecchi, Monticelli, & Cornoldi, 1995).
This study reflects the importance of visual deficits in AD and the potential impact this can have on driving performance.
With these medications, the patient was noted to improve clinically, with control of seizures and resolution of headache and visual deficits. PRES should then be promptly recognized and treated as clinical symptoms are potentially reversible with timely management.
Furthermore, current technology provides noninvasive equipment and methods to assess visual deficits ubiquitously and objectively in naturalistic scenarios [13].
All patients have early severe visual deficits in childhood with their visual acuity <20/400.
They also showed improvement in light sensitivity and peripheral vision, which are two visual deficits these patients experience.
This finding is important because it demonstrates the potential for broad applications of such models to study brain function, even for people with visual deficits.
* "In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), compared with age-matched and young healthy control subjects, visual deficits in the following functions were observed: color, stereoacuity, contrast sensitivity, and backward masking (homogeneous and pattern)." (15)
Obviously, not every person has insight into their visual deficits and subtle deficits may be missed.
Until relatively recently, the training of these skills in athletes were using instruments designed for visual deficits. This type of instruments, according to (Quevedo & Sole, 2007) are valid for visual training with athletes for two reasons relative to the specificity of the population and the task with which it deal.
Therefore, it has been proposed that CSF is a better tool for diagnosing and investigating spatial visual deficits. (4)