Victory Bond

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Victory Bond

A bond issued by the British and Canadian governments in the early 20th century, used to finance their involvement in World War I.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Green America, a non-profit membership organization that promotes ethical consumerism, created the "Clean Energy Victory Bonds" concept as a way to give everyday Americans the opportunity to invest in clean energy and related fields in a fashion similar to how the federal government raised billions of dollars for the war effort during World War II over a half century ago.
The bonds are priced as low as 2 million rials ($185) in an effort to make them appealing to the general public much as the United States marketed Victory Bonds to the US public during World War II, when bonds were priced as low as $25 (in 1940s dollars).
Canadian author Hunter has written a wonderful coming-of-age story set in 1940s Toronto about how one feisty girl, 17-year-old Natalie Brigham, does more than buy Victory Bonds or knit socks in order to help the war effort.
Victory Bonds went on sale in Canada that month, with film director Adolph Zukor recasting scenes from U.S.
In 1906 he founded the magazine John Bull and this, allied to his mesmerising orations, was his key to political success - and, in time, the trapdoor that sent him tumbling as readers were conned into buying his Victory Bonds.
By the 1940s Hollywood's film industry and commercial advertising had managed to turn Hallelujah Lassies into love-struck heroines and promoters of victory bonds.
Something similar was done during World War II, when citizens were encouraged to buy Victory Bonds.
The Government issue of Victory Bonds in 1919 was to prove the undoing of Horatio Bottomley.
In April 1919, the Board discussed at length suggestions by several Reserve Banks to raise the discount rate but decided to keep the rate low to discourage competition with the buying of Victory bonds and to assist the Treasury in keeping the government's interest payments low.
People did spend money on more than just their meagre rations and some Victory Bonds. In fact, as Broad demonstrates, in the early days of the war many Canadians were advised not to cut back, because "the best service that can be rendered is to keep our national economic structure functioning as normally as possible"(pp.
The participation of Mennonite congregations in the Victory Bond drive was a central concern to the censors.