Blister Agent

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Blister Agent

A chemical that causes blisters or other severe irritation on human or animal skin. Occasionally, blister agents are used in medical treatments and may have a commercial value for this reason. However, blister agents are usually used in chemical weapons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vesicants are traditionally used to treat arthritis, tendonitis and splints in racehorses and the trainer had claimed after the original inquiry that it was a remedy used in the racing industry for over 150 years.
The use of laser Doppler imaging as an aid in clinical management decision making in the treatment of vesicant burns.
In addition to measuring sulfur mustard and its degradation products, adducts formed by alkylation of hemoglobin (40), serum albumin (41), and DNA (42) have been identified and considered as potential biomarkers for exposure to this vesicant.
The fact that there was conflicting testimony as to whether or not the patient complained of pain after being "stuck" was compounded by the fact that nurses' notes failed to reflect any problems with the IV push of vesicants.
Paederus dermatitis is caused by accidentally crushing the insect against the skin, so releasing coeleomic fluid that contains pederin, a potent vesicant.
2) The insect contains in its body fluid a vesicant chemical that could cause contact dermatitis.
For oncology nurses, charges of negligence and malpractice can arise in situations ranging from a poorly managed vesicant extravasation to providing inappropriate information during telephone triage.
This can result in the extravasation of fluids and tissue damage, especially if vesicant chemotherapeutic agents are being infused (Freedman & Bosserman, 1993; Wickham, Purl, & Welker, 1992).
A related term, extravasation, is defined as the unplanned administration of a vesicant solution or medication into surrounding tissue (Intravenous Nurses Society, 1998a,b).
Army Medical Research and Material Command granted to Quick-Med Technologies (1)(2), specifically to promote healing of vesicant (i.
We received several letters in response to the January issue's Five-Minute In-Service, "Can You Recognize the Risk Factors for Vesicant Extravasation?