Verst

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Verst

A unit of length approximately equivalent to two-thirds of one mile.
References in periodicals archive ?
Setting out from Tobol 'sk, exiles would march a staggering 1,470 versts to the city of Tomsk, averaging 25 versts a day over a 12-week period with never more than a full day of continuous rest.
In summer 1917 it was planned to build 14 versts of the line from Kherson to the Dnipro and to drop bridge cofferdams in autumn of the same year.
Martha Wilmot, who lived in Russia for five years during the early nineteenth century, wrote in an 1803 letter to her father, 'I swear no Gold headed Cane that your honor ever walked with laid flat on the ground was ever straighter or more uniform that the first 100 versts [106 km] from St Petersburgh on the Moscow road.
Dad, his face like a hundred versts of bad road, jocularly replies that they might take a taxi or a train or fly, which segues into a discussion of how big-winged birds use air currents to glide for miles.
As one sea-faring settler declared in a letter back to Poltava from the Far East in 1893, "I must tell you that I have crossed twenty-five thousand versts by sea and I have seen foreign cities and all types of naked and dark-skinned people.
On the contrary, he admitted that 530 Russian versts (ca.
The boards remained standing many versts outside Ivanovo in a field cut through by Catherine's route.
of the sun, which one could estimate at 7 o'clock, 27 versts [17.
And does the 'little man' Belkin, who is a silly, endearing, self-deflecting mask that is versts away from the sophisticated psychological realism Kropf imputes to him, want 'to become authorized' (p.
Oakville, Ontario, L6J 7R4 Canada) was proudly showing about 25 diamond-in-kimberlite specimens from the Udachny mine, Northern Siberia, and, it must be said, they outdistanced the Chinese ones by several versts.
The captain assumed that he had come to offer his congratulations for a successful navigation of 11,000 versts from the town of Eniseisk to Kronshtadt, but was immediately disappointed: the officer declared that he had been sent to arrest one of the two seamen, Andrei Tsybulenko, an exile to Siberia.
Murav'yov describes how, after the Battle of Borodino (September 7th, 1812), he and his brother Alexander were living in Moscow when one day the director of the broadcloth factory in a village 40 versts away, belonging to Prince Vasiliy Novikov, suddenly appeared at the house.