Congestion

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Related to venous congestion: venous insufficiency

Congestion

A situation where a demand for a security exceeds supply or vice versa. In both cases, a large change in price is likely because investors will have a difficult time entering or leaving a position at its current price. Congestion can lead to a security trading either below its support level (if supply exceeds demand) or above its resistance level (if demand exceeds supply).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kojima, "Leech therapy to alleviate postoperative venous congestion in free flaps: A report of five cases," Japanese Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol.
Since severity of mitral regurgitation is a major determinant of pulmonary venous congestion, our data further support a strong association between plasma concentrations of sCD146 and HF-induced venous congestion.
Free flaps, pedicled flaps, and replanted tissues can survive arterial insufficiency for up to 13 hours, but venous congestion can cause necrosis within three hours.
One case demonstrated venous congestion, even though the mechanical leech was maintained for 7 days postoperatively.
In contrast, surgical interventions are effective in benign causes of upper venous congestion and show relatively few complications.
(2006) Evaluation of the time course of vascular responses to venous congestion in the human lower limb.
At more advanced ages, growth failure, tachycardia due to left ventricular contraction failure and progressive enlargement; dyspnea due to pulmonary venous congestion and hepatomegaly due to systemic venous congestion may be found (9).
None of our cases showed any evidence of venous congestion. Regarding the donor site morbidity, only one case had partial STSG loss.
Her abdominal CT revealed a small amount of fluid in the abdomen and hepatic venous congestion with no evident intra-abdominal injuries.
Starling's curve and law indicates that venous congestion impedes the ability of the heart to maximize cardiac output.