Value Judgment

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Value Judgment

A decision based on what one believes is the right thing to do. The value involved may come from any number of sources. For example, one may make an investment decision based on one's moral values, one's view of the macroeconomic situation, and/or one's willingness to take risks. Often, value judgments occur when the correct decision is not immediately clear.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time every country has its own problems and they will have to address issues and you cannot sit on a value judgement from outside.
Value Judgements is on BBC RadioWales today at 1pm.
But the issue for us as public servants is that we do not make value judgements about any of this.
Avoid value judgements such as "your work is too slow," or "your station is sloppy.
Recognizing the strengths that people have because of a perceived difference and understanding the value judgements we all have because of who we are is integral to a multicultural perspective.
Speaking on the BBC Radio Wales show Value Judgements, which will be broadcast on New Year's Eve, she tells interviewer Phil George that when her close relationship with bandmate Marc Roberts floundered, she threw herself into her work, an increasingly busy schedule which was fuelled by drink and drugs.
Arguing that cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is useful in evaluating any public policy decision because value judgements are inherently involved, Brent (economics, Fordham U.
They concluded that the guidelines needed to be ``more realistic in incorporating the value judgements and clinical assessments'' of surgeons looking at this ``grey'' area of surgery.
In the first programme in a series called Value Judgements on BBC Radio Wales, to be aired tomorrow, Haydn opens his heart on why he decided to leave the priesthood - and celibacy - to pursue a career in business.
of Wisconsin at Madison) examines common sources of miscommunication in daily life; interpretive dimensions of individual and collective performance; the implicit value judgements used to define factual matters; interactive factors associated with the stability and consistency of personal identity; tests of reason and rationality as valued cultural assets; the features of constructive dialogue; and "damaged human relations in view of discordant respondent claims of hurt and harm in relation to tactical matters of repair, renewal, and restoration.
While it is clear that there is a huge difference between the mental powers of an Einstein on the one hand and some, but not all, football supporters on the other, we should not extrapolate from the results of these sometimes arbitrary and limited tests of some kinds of mental ability, into making value judgements of a more fundamental and radical kind.
7 Probably just well, for computers which could learn to make value judgements about unlike variables might really become a threat to the human race as many science fantasts have proposed.