unweighted index

Unweighted Index

An index where all securities represented in it affect the index equally. That is, an unweighted index does not give any preference to aspects like market capitalization or price when one calculates its value. For example, given an unweighted index of three stocks, one priced at $10, one at $15, and one at $20, the value of the index will be $15, which is simply the average of the three prices. The Value Line averages are prominent examples of unweighted indices.

unweighted index

A stock price index that is calculated with equal weighting for each component. Unweighted indexes such as the Value Line averages are useful for individuals who invest an equal dollar amount in each stock.
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1 per cent, while the Kuwait Stock Exchange Unweighted Index fell 0.
6 per cent and the Kuwait Stock Exchange Unweighted Index decreased 0.
This observation, coupled with our concern about degrees of freedom, leads us to use the simple unweighted index of RS in the rest of the article.
Part of the reason for this seems to be that, within each class of goods, products with relatively low market shares tend to show faster price declines than products with higher market shares, giving these price declines a larger role in an unweighted index than in a weighted index.
An unweighted index assigns a level (and associated dollar amount) based on a simple count of the minimum data set (MDS) items.
This investment methodology will often trail the S&P 500 for a given year or two, and then surpass it, because the S&P 500 Index is weighted by the size of the market capitalization of each stock, while the CE100 Index is an unweighted index (which means you buy equal dollar amounts in each company).
The average market cap of the unweighted index is more than $40 billion.
Qatar's QE Index and the Kuwait Stock Exchange Unweighted Index rose 0.
The Kuwait Stock Exchange Unweighted Index and Saudi Arabia's Tadawul All Share Index slipped 0.