Unmerchantable


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Unmerchantable

Describing goods or services of such poor quality that they cannot be sold. Unmerchantable merchandise may be damaged or simply poorly made.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, with the more widespread use of kilns and other methods to create biochar, areas with dead or unmerchantable timber from drought, disease, insect, or wildfire may be a feedstock source for biochar production and help lessen the future risk of wildfire.
(112) Stephen Kapnoullas and Bruce Clarke, 'Countdown to Zero: The Duration of Statutory Rights for Unfit and Unmerchantable Goods' (1999) 14 Journal of Contract Law 154, 155.
The Affected Inter-Op[TM] shells and Affected Natural Knees7 implanted in Plaintiffs and the Class and Subclasses were unsafe, unmerchantable, unfit for use in the body, and otherwise injurious to Plaintiffs and the Class and subclasses.
In New York, the criminal or quasi-criminal jurisdiction of a single JP included enforcement by fine of the statutes governing fraudulent repacking of meat, sale of unmerchantable flour, violation of weights and measures, and the usual run of public morality enforcement, including offenses such as profaning the Sabbath, swearing, public intoxication, dealing in lottery tickets, and providing liquor to slaves and apprentices.
They produce a wide variety of feedstock types (unmerchantable trees, small-diameter trees, tops, limbs, and chunks) with varying moisture contents (25% to 60%).
About 7.7-million-cubic metres is roundwood, with remaining 3.3-cubic metres being unmerchantable tops, branches and undersized wood.
Evidence that the pacemaker was one of a specific group of devices which had a "possibility" or "risk" of failure over and above what was referred to as a "background or random risk of failure" was enough to deem it 'unmerchantable' and the manufacturer liable to compensate the consumer.
QUENTIN SAYS: Technically your M3 was of unmerchantable quality and not fit for the purpose for which it was intended.
The study also contradicts the myth that logging after fires helps reduce the chance of future fires, as logging operations at Biscuit left huge piles of flammable, unmerchantable timber, while the larger, more fire-resistant trees were clear-cut.
Biomass from logging residues such as limbs, tops, and otherwise unmerchantable trees is viewed as a viable feedstock for meeting increased demand (Perlack and Stokes 2011).