Unconscionable

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Unconscionable

In law, describing anything that violates or ought to violate one's conscience. An unconscionable act is unenforceable by a court. For example, a court may rule a contract invalid because its provisions so obviously favor one party that it becomes unconscionable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether de Rojas's venerable text has been violated unconscionably I'll never know, but I certainly was not alone in applauding vigorously for the resulting witches' Sabbath.
Amid the public protests, the Supreme Court issued a temporary restraining order against the unconscionably high generation charge that Meralco wanted to impose last December.
The Valley has long been on the short end of the LAPD's resource-allocation scheme, which, combined with the region's expansive geography, has resulted in unconscionably long police response times.
And when Guber left Sony after five years as president, people close to the studio felt he left friends and associates high and dry, that he reneged on commitments, and that his exit package was staggeringly, even unconscionably, high.
There is a lot more we Filipinos can do to address the "persisting massacre" here that Viewpoint refers to, namely, the unconscionably high infant and maternal death rates due to thousands of underground abortions.
Now, thanks to a report from the county Auditor-Controller's Office, we know that the number of children in county care is artificially high, due to the bureaucracy's unconscionably slow adoption process.
With the exception of the four-part "The Buffalo Soldiers" on PBS in 1970 and a 1979 NBC pilot, "The Buffalo Soldiers," with Stan Shaw (and including Carl Lumbly, of the current project), TV accounts of the Buffalo Soldiers have been inexplicably and unconscionably scarce.
Merchant generators - even some of our own municipal utilities - were gouging us unconscionably.
Unconscionably sadistic, even by genre standards, and mind-numbingly formulaic, this bloody mess opened nationwide Sept.
Harry is also an amazingly well-adjusted person, considering that his cartoonishly cruel aunt and uncle (``the worst sort of Muggles imaginable,'' as one witch describes them) make him live in the cupboard under the stairs and allow his piggy cousin to unconscionably bully the orphan night and day.
Too often, however, McElwee turns inward, devoting unconscionably long stretches to long-winded philosophizing and tedious navel-gazing.
Moonves is unconscionably disingenuous to pretend that putting these lab rats through these inane tests for such bland, predigested entertainment is a ``summer experiment'' (the Lucinda Williams song ``Out of Touch'' kept running through my head while he spoke).