Ascender

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Ascender

An informal term for a stock or other security that has risen in price over a given period. For example, if a stock opens at $5.00 and closes at $5.25, it is said to be an ascender for that trading day. See also: Decliner.
References in periodicals archive ?
A chi square was used rather than an analysis of variance to determine the effect of typeface on perception of ethos since the responses could not be categorized as "correct" or "incorrect." There were three ethos questions for each text passage, each with four possible responses.
Kelly claims that digital versions of typefaces cannot be considered as revivals, that they are nothing more than reformattings.
As a typeface it is not bombastic or too ornamental or overstated.
type director at Monotype beautifully combines words and designs to deliver some of the most identifiable brand typefaces.
Using visual examples and case studies, Boutros takes the reader through the entire range of graphic design applications - newspaper and television news typefaces, book jacket designs, corporate and brand identity, logotype conversions, advertising, design for print and fine art.
PAGES OF 36 Although the typeface has changed slightly, it is still of a similar old style - clearly heritage was a priority.
Ink is a huge cost sink, he learned, and leaner typefaces are a way to fight back.
According to The Verge, the typeface reflects the redesigned ensemble as a whole on the new kit, which has been produced by Nike.
Next up is her Buttercream typeface line, which debuts to the public this winter, and Penguin Books new set of classics emblazoned with her ornate capital letters.
On the striking rough, heavy orange paper cover (fifty of the copies were prepared with paper covers; the other thirty are in quarter-leather and printed paper-over-boards), we are confronted initially by two faces--linoleum cuts of a young Whitman on the front cover and an elderly Whitman on the back--but as we think about it, we realize the cover actually presents us with three faces, since on the spine appears "Walt Whitman's Faces" in Bulmer typeface. That play on the word face--as referring both to human faces and to type faces--is the key to the "typographic reading" of "Faces" that Henry offers.
According to the company, the new typeface family features elements such as speech bubbles and cartoon dingbats, extending the versatility of the original Comic Sans.
This tension among the typeface's many meanings was one of the themes of Gary Hustwit's excellent 2007 documentary Helvetica, which featured many shots of New York City subway signage.