turnover

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Turnover

For mutual funds, a measure of trading activity during the previous year, expressed as a percentage of the average total assets of the fund. A turnover rate of 25% means that the value of trades represented one-fourth of the assets of the fund. For finance, the number of times a given asset, such as inventory, is replaced during the accounting period, usually a year. For corporate finance, the ratio of annual sales to net worth, representing the extent to which a company can grow without outside capital. For markets, the volume of shares traded as a percent of total shares listed during a specified period, usually a day or a year. For Great Britain, total revenue. Percentage of the total number of shares outstanding of an issue that trades during any given period.

Turnover

1. In accounting, the number of times or the speed at which a company replaces an asset in a given period of time. This usually refers to the amount of time it takes for the company to collect its accounts receivable or the number of times it has to procure new inventory to replace that which it has already sold. Companies desire a fast or high turnover, as this indicates financial health.

2. The number of shares traded in a portfolio over a given period of time, expressed as a percentage of the number of shares in the portfolio. A low turnover means that the portfolio is not being very actively managed; it also means that one's broker is making less in commissions, as he/she is paid per trade. See also: Churning.

turnover

1. The trading volume of the market or of a particular security.
2. The number of times that an asset is replaced during a given period. For example, an inventory turnover of five indicates that the firm's inventory has been turned into sales and has been replaced five times.

turnover

see SALES REVENUE, LABOUR TURNOVER.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers investigating employee turnover theories in the hospitality industry suggest that there are specific factors influencing the trend (D' Annunzio-Green, Maxwell & Watson, 2004).
Given the importance of board committee structure and the potential for CEOs to control the composition of these committees, it is useful to examine changes in committee structu re following forced CEO turnover to determine the extent to which a new CEO is a catalyst for change in board committee structure.
Figure 1 illustrates that turnover may be 6 percent in one month and jump to 11 percent in the third month.
Of the 160 CEO turnovers, 105 (66 percent) are the result of normal retirements either mandated by the company policy or initiated by the CEO, rather than the result of forced retirements or terminations for poor performance or other causes.
But they were disgusted with their turnovers and inability to create any.
CEOs are being replaced at a faster rate in Europe than the United States, and CEO turnover has skyrocketed in Asia, where chief executives of major corporations had been relatively protected from market forces.
They capitalized on three turnovers in a 22-19 victory Oct.
Simply put, this defense isn't good enough to defend short fields because of turnovers.
But CSUN had just four turnovers in the second half, played good defense, outscored Montana 42-26, and was sparked by a career-high eight points - all at the free-throw line - by senior walk-on Michael Scott.
Even so, it didn't matter that the Sparks committed 26 turnovers and that star Lisa Leslie was saddled with foul problems throughout the second half.