turnover


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Related to turnover: turnover rate, annual turnover

Turnover

For mutual funds, a measure of trading activity during the previous year, expressed as a percentage of the average total assets of the fund. A turnover rate of 25% means that the value of trades represented one-fourth of the assets of the fund. For finance, the number of times a given asset, such as inventory, is replaced during the accounting period, usually a year. For corporate finance, the ratio of annual sales to net worth, representing the extent to which a company can grow without outside capital. For markets, the volume of shares traded as a percent of total shares listed during a specified period, usually a day or a year. For Great Britain, total revenue. Percentage of the total number of shares outstanding of an issue that trades during any given period.

Turnover

1. In accounting, the number of times or the speed at which a company replaces an asset in a given period of time. This usually refers to the amount of time it takes for the company to collect its accounts receivable or the number of times it has to procure new inventory to replace that which it has already sold. Companies desire a fast or high turnover, as this indicates financial health.

2. The number of shares traded in a portfolio over a given period of time, expressed as a percentage of the number of shares in the portfolio. A low turnover means that the portfolio is not being very actively managed; it also means that one's broker is making less in commissions, as he/she is paid per trade. See also: Churning.

turnover

1. The trading volume of the market or of a particular security.
2. The number of times that an asset is replaced during a given period. For example, an inventory turnover of five indicates that the firm's inventory has been turned into sales and has been replaced five times.

turnover

see SALES REVENUE, LABOUR TURNOVER.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, it is a normative belief held by employees that turnover behavior is quite appropriate.
Small TL carriers saw the average annualized turnover rate drop to 102 percent from 112 percent during the first three months of the year.
Quick turnover means facilities are often short-handed, meaning potential reduced care levels and increased job dissatisfaction levels for existing work staff, experts noted.
Index funds generally have a low turnover rate, which minimizes the current taxable income distributed to shareholder.
The latest Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) Labour Turnover Survey shows that labour turnover for all employees stands at 16.
If you assume the cost to replace a nurse is $46,000, an organization with 600 nursing FTEs and a turnover rate of 20 percent would spend $5.
The 80's neighborhood was the strongest market on the Upper West Side, as the turnover rate increased from 1.
However, financial economic research has primarily focused on the factors that impact the likelihood of CEO turnover (e.
Like hospitals, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) face increasing cost and regulatory pressure, but they have also experienced greater turnover rates among staff and bear the brunt of the population growth among the elderly.
BETTING turnover on the Martell Grand National threatened to break through the pounds 100 million barrier as Britain's major bookmakers reported unprecedented activity-and the shock result will have proved a huge boost to bookmaker profits, writes David Ashforth.
This paper investigates the after-tax performance of bond mutual funds relative to portfolio turnover using stochastic dominance (SD) analysis.
Scott Cooley, a mutual fund analyst for Morningstar, the Chicago firm that keeps an eye on the industry, says the average stock fund has a turnover rate (the percentage of its portfolio sold and replaced in any given year) of 90%, as funds replace their holdings with new ones.