Turn

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Turn

In the equities market, a reversal; unwind.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Reversal

A change in a security's price trend.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Once the suspect realized he was staring down the barrel of a gun, he turned tail and ran away from the scene.
But officers who shut the road were relieved when the pigs obediently turned tail and trotted back to their farm.
As I drew my bow, the arrow clattered off the rest and both deer turned tail and ran a short distance before turning back to see a stupid human bent over in a vain attempt to catch his breath and slow the heart now hammering in his chest.
The missile missed aim after the drone turned tail and returned to Syria.
This rhino mother showed she had a thick skin when she firstly gave the jumbos the evil eye as they appeared to threaten her calf, then charged the big beasts who turned tail and scarpered.
"Many of the terrorists had turned tail and run away already," Erdogan said in a speech in western Turkey.
The mother mice puffed up her lungs and went, 'woof, woof!.' The cat turned tail and ran.
one one-time definite Leaver is now an undecided, so the rumour goes, and might, just might, have turned tail and become a Remainer.
Asian markets turned tail on Wednesday as fears over instability in the European Union returned with a vengeance.
But when the cue came for the donkey to walk up a ramp into the church, it refused to budge, turned tail and went back into its horse box.
The mayor of Lampedusa, Giusi Nicolini, (http://video.repubblica.it/dossier/lampedusa-strage-di-migranti/lampedusa-il-sindaco-incendio-ignorato-da-tre-pescherecci/141784/140318) said that fishing crews turned tail because they could have been charged with breaking immigration laws if they had rescued the migrants and taken them ashore.
Cheap dollars that fueled a boom in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa over the past decade have turned tail since Ben Bernanke, chairman of the Federal Reserve, warned in May of a 'taper' in the U.S.