Vision

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Vision

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The inventor of the Tunnel Vision now seeks a third party licensee to manufacture, market, and distribute the product for him under a royalty agreement.
In a shooting, expect to experience tunnel vision and be prepared to deal with its effects.
We want to do more of the stuff that puts Birmingham on the map, such as The Great Swallow or Tunnel Vision, stuff that makes you go 'wow'.
CATHOLIC in reference to our primary audience, not out of a tunnel vision of concern only about this country.
It was not uncommon for pilots to lose peripheral vision in a conical manner, with the resulting tunnel vision restricting the ability to scan instrument gauges for precious seconds, much less fly the aircraft.
Thirty-seven percent had tunnel vision, while 18 percent experienced greater visual detail.
Students are challenged to make a pact with themselves to be patient and practice faithfully, to be aware of what they are playing, to be curious by asking questions about how the music sounded and to use tunnel vision, tackling one problem at a time in small sections.
Physicians' acceptance of a scientific world-view and use of scientific methodology create tunnel vision that impedes our consideration of religious issues.
Gzowski also bequeathed, alas, a degree of media tunnel vision that imperils the very life of free-ranging democratic debate in this country.
The authors explain why tunnel vision predictions such as the paperless office haven't materialized: "Attending too closely to information [per se] overlooks the social context that helps people understand what that information might mean and why it matters.
Strategic tunnel vision is continuing to think about the future in only the same terms and parameters of the past.
Some might argue that biography, though a standard genre of much historical literature, often suffers from a type of tunnel vision that restricts its ability to denote sweeping interpretation because of its obsession with ubiquitous detail.