Trustbuster

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Related to trustbusters: Clayton Antitrust Act

Trustbuster

A person or, less commonly, an organization that seeks to break monopolies into several companies or to shut them down entirely in order to encourage competition in the free market. The word is strongly associated with Theodore Roosevelt, the early 20th-century U.S. president who opposed the early industrial monopolies.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In fact it was the ghost of trustbusters past in the form of the 1921 Martin Act that enabled Spitzer to throw down the gauntlet on Wall Street.
While his views were akin to those of reformist New Deal trustbusters in the sense that both distrusted concentrated economic power in cartels and monopolies, their goals were very different.
(See "The New Trustbusters," March.) Nor are the attorneys general alone in their casual attitude toward such property.
Jenkins Jr., On Microsoft, Standard Oil and Trustbusters, WALL ST.
government trustbusters broke up the Standard Oil empire founded by John D.
And to overcome these goliaths, we need to channel the trustbusters of that earlier era--above all Brandeis, who, with what Wu calls his "sensitivity to human ends," was among the first to identify the broader spiritual and political cost of concentration.
MIT Technology Review's San Francisco bureau chief, Martin Giles, sat down with him to talk about the challenges trustbusters face in dealing with the latest generation of tech giants.
Moreover, these previous trustbusters are suspected of neither exposing nor disciplining those chaebol groups that failed to report changes in their stock ownership.
TRUSTBUSTERS: COMPETITION POLICY AUTHORITIES SPEAK OUT 8 (David S.
A recent collection of essays written by prominent economists and law professors and edited by Bob Pitofsky, Bill Clinton's Federal Trade Commission chair, announces that the Chicago school "overshot the mark" and steered antitrust law in a "profoundly wrong direction." (See "The Trustbusters' Revival Misfires," p.
WASHINGTON The bets are on: Can EchoStar topper Charlie Ergen convince regulators and trustbusters to approve the proposed merger with DirecTV?
The most uncompromising trustbusters, like William Jennings Bryan, got branded as provincial figures who viewed the normal outcome of the competitive process as a grand conspiracy.