Trilateral Commission

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Related to trilateralism: postmodernism

Trilateral Commission

An informal group of 300 to 400 people from North America, Europe, and East Asia who meet several times a year to discuss public policy with an eye toward promoting globalization and integration. Membership is by invitation and current government officials are excluded from membership. However, many members go on to become high political executives. The Trilateral Commission has been controversial throughout its history, with some accusing it of promoting a one-world government. It was established in 1973 by David Rockefeller. See also: Council on Foreign Relations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Public attitude in Nepal towards trilateralism is yet to match Prachanda's optimistic calculations.
Ancient Greek arbitration is best characterized, therefore, as authoritative trilateralism.
Is this kind of trilateralism simply a more sophisticated version of Eurocentrism?
The world has moved away from American hegemony to some sort of trilateralism among the United States, the European Community, and Japan.
Trilateralism, which gained some prominence in the late 1970s, was not able to attain either a successful mode of cooperation in international affairs or any popular political appeal at home.
Second, the CAI's fundamental principle of trilateralism, in which each level of government was an equal partner not only in cost-sharing but, as well, in decision-making, was a distinctive trait.
Equally vain were excursions into Trilateralism and Thatcherism-Reaganism.
It should not be viewed in isolation but in concert with other similar initiatives taking place at the same time: parallel overtures to India and the promotion of concepts of security trilateralism (Japan-India-US/Japan-Australia-US) and quadrilateralism (Japan-US-Australia-India), backed by the overt rhetoric of "shared values" and references to "strategic partnerships" based on common security interests.
The "internationalism" championed by the Committee was then the program supported by the consensus of Wall Street and Foggy Bottom, and is today the politica legacy of the liberalism and later the Trilateralism of the Democratic and Republican parties through the mid-1970s.