Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) The algorithm evaluates the score function of a set of trial points. It then takes the point with the best score and runs local solver from that point.
Then, a trial point, [v.sup.i], is generated along a search direction (starting from the current point) with a certain step size [mathematical expression not reproducible] as follows:
A trial point [x.sup.+.sub.k] is accepted if and only if ([h.sup.+.sub.k], [f.sup.+.sub.k]) [not member of] D([F.sub.k]).
However, he said that this first human clinical trial points to exciting avenues for XanGo Juice's use in the maintenance of heart health and other conditions that may be connected to inflammation.
But neither physician suggested that the trial points to an improvement in the progression of heart disease in a patient group Dr.
Larson (1999), some seven decades after the, trial pointed out in the same law journal that what Bryan actually accomplished was to use the Scopes case as a platform for advancing the notion of liberty.