Rise

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Rise

To increase in price, especially for a security. If a stock's price is $10 per share at the start of the trading day and $15 at the end, the stock is said to have risen.
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References in classic literature ?
To make matters worse, this dangerous river travel could not be done in the dark, and their working day was reduced to the six hours of twilight.
In the morning he could not travel. At five, when called, he sat up after a struggle, groaned, and sank back again.
`That shall travel indifferently in any direction of Space and Time, as the driver determines.'
`One might travel back and verify the accepted account of the Battle of Hastings, for instance!'
'Oh, go with me,' said the man; 'if we four are together we shall easily travel through the wide world.'
For we must call him something, and as no one really knows who wrote the book which is known as The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville, we may as well call the author by the name he chose as by another.
But what people ever travel across the country from Upton hither, especially to London?
As this is the only excursion of the kind which I have made in all the accounts I have given of my travels, so I shall make no more such.
Yes, to travel with a courier is bliss, to travel without one is the reverse.
Occasionally he fell in with Akut and his tribe, hunting with them for a day or two; or he might travel to the hill country where the baboons had come to accept him as a matter of course; but most of all was he with Tantor, the elephant--the great gray battle ship of the jungle--the super-dreadnaught of his savage world.
They traveled in this way through the east of the Union, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire; the north and west by New York, Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin; returning to the south by Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Texas, and Louisiana; they went to the southeast by Alabama and Florida, going up by Georgia and the Carolinas, visiting the center by Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, and Indiana, and, after quitting the Washington station, re-entered Baltimore, where for four days one would have thought that the United States of America were seated at one immense banquet, saluting them simultaneously with the same hurrahs!
Yet notwithstanding it is only a record of a pic-nic, it has a purpose, which is to suggest to the reader how he would be likely to see Europe and the East if he looked at them with his own eyes instead of the eyes of those who traveled in those countries before him.