Spider

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Spider

See: SPDRs
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Spider

Also called a Standard & Poor's Depositary Receipt or a SPDR. An exchange-traded fund that tracks the Standard and Poor's 500. The organization issuing the SPDR owns each of the stocks traded on the S&P 500 in approximate ratio to their market capitalization. SPDR shares can be bought, sold, short-sold, traded on margin; they generally function as if they were stocks. Dividends are paid quarterly and are based on the accumulated dividends of all the stocks represented in the SPDR, less any expenses. Investors use SPDRs (and indeed all exchange-traded funds) as a way to easily diversify their portfolios at relatively low cost. Investors also see the demand for SPDRs as an indicator of which direction the market believes the S&P 500 is going. See also: Mid-Cap SPDR.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

spider

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2015) for migid trapdoor spiders of the genus Bertmainius Harvey, Main, Rix & Cooper, 2015, and by Rix et al.
Etymology.--This species is named in honor of Emeritus Professor Barbara Main (of the University of Western Australia), in recognition of her seminal contributions to mygalomorph systematics, and to our understanding of giant spiny trapdoor spiders of the genus Gaius.
Trapdoor spiders traditionally have a lifespan of five to 20 years.
Therefore, Barkuda Island was surveyed rapidly in August 2007 for trapdoor spiders, and a few mature female individuals of Diplothele sp.
06/16/02 FLAG) provided financial support to the Indian Tarantula Project, during which survey trips these trapdoor spiders were found.
Minimal genetic variation in a coastal dune arthropod: the trapdoor spider Aptostichus simus (Cyrtaucheniidae).
Observations on the natural history of an Ummidia trapdoor spider from Costa Rica (Araneae, Ctenizidae).
Tarantulas are the largest spiders in the world, belonging to the order Mygalomorph, which includes tarantulas, trapdoor spiders, and other less well-known groups.
Trapdoor spiders and tarantulas are the subject of Chapter 4.
Trapdoor spiders, for example, dig a burrow in the ground and make a trapdoor from silk mixed with soil.