translation

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Related to translatory: translatory movement

Translation

When a parent-subsidiary relationship exists between two companies in different countries using different currencies, the act or practice of changing the financial statements of the subsidiary to conform to the accounting standards of the parent's country, as well as re-denominating the subsidiary's currency into the parent's currency. According to the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States, the translation of a foreign currency to U.S. dollars must be accurate as of the date on the financial statement. If there have been substantial changes to the exchange rate since that date, the consolidated financial statement must note this.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

translation

The expression of amounts denominated in one currency in terms of another currency by using the rate at which two currencies are exchanged. For example, a firm with foreign operations might express sales made in German marks in terms of U.S. dollars. Also called foreign currency translation.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recognizing the potential for such an interpretive breach, Daneshvar occasionally finds it necessary to interpolate footnotes into her Persian translation, innovating paratextual tools aimed at guiding her reader's understanding of this foreign "A." Reminiscent of her translatory gloss of phrases such as "the scarlet letter," Daneshvar's footnotes seek to mitigate the difficulties of Hawthorne's alphabetic symbolism, granting her audience access to information readily available to Anglo-American readers.
We developed the purely passive mechanical device, Nudelholz (Figure 3), with 3 DOF (2 translatory and 1 rotatory), again following the approach of bilateral and distal training.
Such wonderfully wild translations both invigorate English and challenge traditional approaches to translation by making sound, not semantics, the basis of the equivalence that the translatory act aims at (225, 231, 232).
The sequence of sentences shows that Ilka Boll had been following a definite translatory strategy: translating for the theatre.
Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic literary scholarship, insofar as it is of a translatory nature in the broadest sense, certainly as a part of area studies--talking in language A about poetry in language B, talking in culture A about poetry in culture B--is especially in danger of content bias, but intralinguistic scholarship by no means guarantees due regard for form either.
Stiffness or laxity in accessory movements can then be matched to knowledge of normal translatory and rotary movements coupled with end range physiological movements to determine relative involvement of different structures (Harryman et al 1990, 1992, Terry et al 1991).
(1989): "Translation in Bilingual Conversation: Pragmatic Aspects of Translatory Interaction", Journal of Pragmatics 13: 713-739.
And all we might infer from ancient testimonies about the translatory activities of a Sisenna and his contemporary Varro--these two must have known each other fairly well--might be revealing when looked at from new perspectives.
This is because the dominant pattern of image motion is then a translatory flow in the front-to-back direction.
By the conventional interpretation, translatory and centripetal accelerations can be regarded as two extremes of the motion vector.
Tom Lamont's own work on the blues sets out to address what he calls the "problematic of translation: how to make meaningful what is alien to us." (4) His specific concern is with two examples of "folk" oral/musical traditions, where "the translatory ground is acoustic, not textual," and where the problem, therefore, "is more properly described as how to hear meaning in alien and unexpected sounds." This point is far too often overlooked in much of the literature on the blues: what matters is not "texts" and not "artifacts," but lived (and originally, "live") perfomative events; above all, as I will argue in some detail in what follows, it is not the form that is crucial, but the elemental power of the musical-tonal "matter." (5)