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Translation

When a parent-subsidiary relationship exists between two companies in different countries using different currencies, the act or practice of changing the financial statements of the subsidiary to conform to the accounting standards of the parent's country, as well as re-denominating the subsidiary's currency into the parent's currency. According to the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States, the translation of a foreign currency to U.S. dollars must be accurate as of the date on the financial statement. If there have been substantial changes to the exchange rate since that date, the consolidated financial statement must note this.

translation

The expression of amounts denominated in one currency in terms of another currency by using the rate at which two currencies are exchanged. For example, a firm with foreign operations might express sales made in German marks in terms of U.S. dollars. Also called foreign currency translation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2008, Eurispes (The European Institute of Political, Economic, and Social Studies) showcased Translated as a company representing excellence in Italy.
Forbidden Words by Eugenio de Andrade Translated by Alexis Levitin.
According to The Book Standard, Suite Francaise was translated by Sandra Smith and Ecrits was translated by Bruce Fink.
Under the 1991 proposed regulations, taxable Income or loss of a QBU would first be computed in local currency and then the taxable income or loss would be translated into the owner's functional currency.
Translation memories are optimal tools for highly repetitive texts that belong to a larger corpus of specialized texts to be translated, present a wide specialized terminology pool and belong to multilingual localization projects.
Not only will the translation be more readable, but you'll also save money by reducing the number of words that need to be translated.
For example, Ainsi parla l'oncle (Thus Spoke the Uncle), a collection of essays by Jean Price-Mars (1876-1969), was published in French in 1928, but it wasn't translated into English until 1997.
During the Confiteor, the Latin mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa is translated accurately as "through my fault, through my fault, through my most grievous fault" and not just "through my own fault.
James Joyce's Ulysses has been translated into Japanese three times, each time by outstanding writers.
However, to be most useful, environmental health information needs to be translated into other languages.
Mariantonietta Acocella examines the fortunes and mutations of these narratives as they were translated into the vernacular, interpreted and adapted for a Christian public, and depicted in engravings, paintings, and fresco cycles.