Smuggling

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Smuggling

The secretive transportation of goods in violation of law or regulation. For example, one may smuggle drugs or other illegal goods. Alternately, one may smuggle legal goods by taking them to a prohibited area (such as a prison) or by not following applicable rules (such as not paying a tariff).
References in periodicals archive ?
Domestic sex trafficking of children is sex trafficking within the United States involving a commercial sex act in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age.
Government complicity in human trafficking remained a problem.
Despite increased efforts to act against people trafficking, the report claims that a significant number of Korean and other female victims were trafficked to the United States in 2004.
The presence, or lack of, state and local law determines whether a location serves as a source area or a market area in the illegal world of trafficking. A source area usually serves as a place where individuals obtain firearms, especially handguns, easier due to less stringent state or local firearm laws.
The government fully funded victim protection efforts for trafficking victims, whether foreign or domestic.
The Government of Kiribati failed to demonstrate any meaningful law enforcement efforts to combat human trafficking during the reporting period.
The Coordinator fully funded an NGO shelter providing a range of services, including housing, medical, and psychological care to trafficking victims.
The Government of Norway sustained strong victim protection efforts, although an NGO reported that a child trafficking victim was penalized and deported for crimes that he or she committed as a result of being trafficked.
In 2010, Polish police investigated 95 alleged trafficking offenses, down from 105 investigations in 2009.
Sweden's 2002 anti-trafficking law prohibits trafficking for both sexual exploitation and forced labor and prescribes penalties of two to 10 years' imprisonment.
The Government of Finland fully complies with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking. Although victim identification numbers remained low, the government initiated new forced labor prosecutions and drafted an in-depth assessment of the government's anti-trafficking efforts, which will be made public later in 2010.
Kiribati is a source country for girls subjected to trafficking in persons, specifically commercial sexual exploitation.