Trade Surplus

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Trade Surplus

A nation's excess of exports over imports during a given time frame.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Trade Surplus

The difference between the value of a country's exports and the value of its imports, where the value of exports is greater. Analysts disagree on the impact, if any, of a trade surplus on the economy. Some economists believe that a trade surplus creates employment and increases GDP growth. Others believe that the balance of trade has little impact. A trade surplus is also called a favorable balance of trade. See also: Trade deficit.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

trade surplus

The amount of goods and services that a country exports that is in excess of the amount of goods and services it imports. A trade surplus increases economic activity in a country but also may result in higher prices and interest rates if the economy is already operating at near capacity. Compare trade deficit.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This could be explained by a weakness in Philippines peso compared to the US dollar, in which all trade surpluses and deficits are expressed.
The trade surpluses recorded in the recent months suggest that the region is suffering from a weak domestic demand.
While running trade deficits with Asian neighbors like Taiwan to tie them politically to Beijing, China is running record trade surpluses with the European Union and the United States, making America and the West as dependent upon China for our manufactures as we are on OPEC for our oil.
The large rise in the price of copper, soybeans, and iron ore is producing large trade surpluses for Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and Peru.
Significant improvements were made in bulk petrochemicals and intermediates, plastic resin and other industrial chemical trade surpluses. However, the global economy is not maintaining the momentum of 2000, experts reported.
September was the 23rd consecutive month of trade surpluses recorded since November 1997.
Japan has had large trade surpluses for the last several decades, because the household savings have been larger than the domestic investment.
This article will explore the cases of the Top 5 trade surpluses in 2016, how they got there, and what's next for them.