Proprietary Information

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Proprietary Information

The information, concepts, designs or anything else that sets a business apart from its competitors and that is therefore kept secret. Other examples of proprietary information may include a company's computer systems, employee salaries, and so forth. Proprietary information may always be kept secret and is never subject to public disclosure. For instance, a fried chicken restaurant is never required to reveal the spices used in its recipe. Proprietary information is also called a trade secret.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, any business with confidential, valuable information should develop its cybersecurity practices with protection of its trade secrets in mind.
If you do so, your metalcasting facility may be eligible to recover double damages or attorney fees in trade secret litigation.
In contrast, if the business did not take reasonable measures to keep the client list confidential--such as keeping it on a public website--the trade secret would not be protected by the DTSA.
Like the DTSA, the Directive seeks to harmonize trade secret laws across the EU, in accordance with the TRIPS Agreement, by providing a common definition of what a trade secret is, how trade secrets are to be protected, and what remedies are available for misappropriation.
In this live webcast, a panel of thought leaders and professionals assembled by The Knowledge Group will provide the audience with an in-depth analysis of the fundamentals as well as the legal framework of the Defense Trade Secrets Act of 2016.
law does not provide a federal private right of action for trade secret misappropriation.
Virtually all of the Trade Secret stores are located in the eastern part of Australia.
However, if the SDS lists a trade secret material that is very benign, then we can see scenarios where the treating physician or nurse will probably not hit the panic button and force the information out of you.
In fact, trade secret breaches are often directed against former business partners, or third parties looking to enter joint ventures.
At present there is no harmonisation Directive or a Community trade secret based on a Regulation.
For certain information, trade secret protection is a good option for protecting that information.