Toxin

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Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
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Since both the environmental pollution and the eating habits may affect the metal concentrations [16,20-23], such levels could be measured as an index of toxicants exposure.
Poisons in very small###most exhibit immediate effects toxicants that cause
McMahon of the University of Texas at Arlington says, "Zebra mussels take this stuff out the water column and concentrate it in their digestive systems to levels that are toxic." Aquatic organisms that don't filter feed, as mussels do, would take in only inconsequential amounts of the toxicant, he adds.
If we can say loyalty is the tonic for revolution, then wild ambition is the toxicant for revolution.
Clear panels at the top and bottom take advantage of the flies' instinctive desire to move towards light, where a lethal sugary toxicant awaits them.
Creosote was the only toxicant that significantly affected the cytotoxic activity of hemocytes toward either K562 or RRBC targets (Table IV).
With a 60% increase in the number of women reporting difficulty getting pregnant--including a 200% increase among women less than 25 years old--epidemiologists closely are monitoring associations between exposure to metal toxicants (such as mercury, cadmium, lead, and arsenic) and reduced fertility and poorer IVF outcomes.
There are many methods to detect this toxicant, but in addition to high costs, these methods are time-consuming and require skillful and expert people to carry out the tests.
Washington, Mar 26 ( ANI ): Researchers have shown in their first clinical study of their novel prototype cigarettes that it is possible to reduce smokers' exposure to certain smoke toxicants.
Although environmental health research contributes to understanding key factors relevant to some infectious diseases, environmental health research and practice predominantly focus on chemical and physical agents, in spite of the inherent role of the environment in pathogen dynamics and host response, and the potential for several major toxicant exposures to cause immunotoxic changes in hosts that reduce the threshold for infection, increase the persistence of an infection, increase pathogen shedding, and alter the severity and burden of infections disease.
In one study, ozone appeared to be a culprit behind diminished sperm counts, suggesting that it's a "sperm toxicant," say Rebecca Z.
"Classic reductionist thinking in toxicology focuses on 'one toxicant, one outcome' research," the authors write.