Tout

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Tout

To promote a security in order to attract buyers.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Tout

To strongly encourage investors to buy a particular security. Touting usually comes from someone with a strong interest in seeing the security's price rise, such as a large shareholder, a public relations firm, or even the issuing company itself. To tout is illegal in some circumstances, notably around the date of registration with the SEC.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

tout

To foster interest in a particular company or security. For example, a broker might tout a security to a client in the hope that the client will purchase the security.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Section 15A of the Minor Offences Act 1955 which states that any person who is found guilty of 'touting' shall be guilty of an offence punishable with a fine not exceeding RM500 or with imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to both.
"This football club will not tolerate touting and will continue to identify offenders and take further legal action through the Courts to ensure that our club and the surrounding area are safe for our loyal supporters and visitors.
"Much ticket touting is also linked to crime networks so buying from touts is only supporting organised crime.
VENUE'S VOW OF SILENCE DESPITE huge public opposition to ticket touting at the Hydro, the venue's owners stonewalled the Record when we quizzed them about the Ticketmaster contract.
Det Sgt Jonathan Jones said: "Ticket touting isn't just about financial gain.
Inspector Christofi Miltiades heads up the Paphos Crime Protection squad, which is designated to deal with touting. He too voiced frustration.
Touting of football tickets is illegal because of the danger of hooliganism if rival sets of fans are not kept apart.
The former Minister for Sport Jim McDaid had said publicly that he was not in favour of ticket touting and was looking at ways of trying to stamp it out.
A Greater Manchester police source said: "We will be investigating the ticket touting allegations.
He said: "We welcome the judgement of Mr Justice Nugee at the High Court today, when an injunction was granted against ticket touting at Cheltenham racecourse.
"It is fairer for fans, eliminates counterfeiting, combats touting and allows us to have a complete view of everyone at the event."
Ian Staines, 39, was jailed for four months for breaching a five -year banning order for touting.