On

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On

Used in the context of general equities. Conjunction that denotes trade execution /indication, usually during a pre-opening look. "Looks 6 on 6000 shares at opening." See: for/at.
References in classic literature ?
The touch of his hand was pleasant to her, and something deliciously more than pleasant.
The many hours he was not with Ruth he devoted to the "Love-cycle," to reading at home, or to the public reading-rooms, where he got more closely in touch with the magazines of the day and the nature of their policy and content.
Scull it is, pardner--don't fret yourself--I didn't touch him.
You'll have to stay in goal to touch the ball when it rolls behind the posts, because if the other side touch it they have a try at goal.
As soon as the ball gets past them, it's in touch, and out of play.
I doubted and feared about it till you passed; and then I was obliged to steal after you, and touch you.
The first touch of womanly tenderness that I had heard from her trembled in her voice as she said the words; but no tears glistened in those large, wistfully attentive eyes of hers, which were still fixed on me.
They are, moreover, of a rough coarse nature, not sensitive to the delicate touch of the highly organized Polygon.
Our sense of touch, stimulated by necessity, and developed by long training, enables us to distinguish angles far more accurately than your sense of sight, when unaided by a rule or measure of angles.
Over the crown of the Calton Hill, to his left, lay the way to Colette's, where Alan would soon be looking for his arrival, and where he would now have no more consented to go than he would have wilfully wallowed in a bog; the touch of the girl's hand on his sleeve, and the kindly light in his father's eyes, both loudly forbidding.
It was not the touch he needed most at such a moment - the touch that could calm the wild waters of his soul, as the uplifted hand of the sublimest love and patience could abate the raging of the sea - yet it was a woman's hand too.
The touch of the Queen's soft white hand did the poor little sick child no good, and it is quaint to remember that the great learned doctor thought it might be because he had been touched by the wrong royal hand.