elevation

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elevation

An orthographic (flattened;nonperspective) drawing of the various faces of a building, component, or improvement, showing examples of relevant details and something to indicate scale.One may have elevations of each side of a building,usually with a person standing nearby to illustrate scale; elevations of cabinets in kitchens or offices; or elevations of a storm sewer system showing a representation of the incline.

References in periodicals archive ?
These actions follow the completion of Torus National's acquisition by Torus from TIG Insurance Co, a holding company that is ultimately owned by Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd (TSE:FFH), the agency said.
Genetic influence on the prevalence of torus palatinus.
Also, the outline of the subtending aperture frequently can be seen in the aspirated torus.
On a torus, by contrast, a loop that goes around the hole can't be pulled tight to a single point.
In addition, Figures 16 & 17 indicate that torus degradation can vary and can be especially pronounced in the central layer (or middle lamella region) of this thickening.
In 2011, Torus is expected to report a technical loss in excess of USD 50 million, reflecting its exposure to natural catastrophes in the first half of the year, including the earthquakes in New Zealand and Japan and the Australian floods.
When a torus is present, the aperture is small in diameter (smaller than the torus) and is circular to slightly elliptical in outline.
He quickly realized that this shape looks a lot like the surface around the central hole of a torus.
Launched in 2008, Torus now has over 500 employees in 13 offices worldwide.
Hutchings, a graduate student at Harvard University, proved a conjecture that narrowed the candidates to the standard double bubble and the torus bubble.
By providing highly reliable, manageable and secure network infrastructure services, the Infoblox platforms have helped Torus to increase security, reduce administrative overhead and produce an immediate return on investment.
People have trouble in teleoperation," Lumelsky says, because most human teleoperators find it difficult to think geometrically, imagining themselves as bugs on a torus and then translating that perspective into specific manipulations of the master arm in normal three-dimensional space.