ZEP

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ZEP

Zone d'Exchanges Preferentiels pour les Etats de l'Afrique de l'Est et de l'Afrique Australe. An international organization that promotes cooperation between member states in agriculture, the use of industrial and natural resources, trade, monetary issues and customs. Members include Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Somalia, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. It was established in 1981 and is based in Zambia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Global manufacturers from France, Sweden, Russia and Germany have been issued tenders for the heavyweight torpedoes for the Navy.
The torpedo showing detached air cylinder and warhead, left, and afterbody, right
You've read about some of the others: special steel springs for torpedoes and bombs; portable steel landing mats for bombers; new steels for aviation; tin plate, made with only a fraction of the precious tin once needed.
The MND source told (http://www.defensenews.com/articles/us-taiwan-move-forward-on-new-torpedoes) Defense News that China will not easily invade Taiwan because of Taipei's ten attack submarines equipped with Mk-48 torpedoes and additional UGM-84L Harpoons.
" We had about 60 odd SUT torpedos which were undergoing upgradation for the four, older Shishumar submarines.
The controlled demolition of the torpedo's warhead started at 8am yesterday.
The student explained that the plan, which seems to be in the preliminary stages, includes manufacturing of an unmanned submarine (sometimes known as underwater drone) capable of discovering mines and firing torpedoes.
Freezer, safe home in the trench, remarked that the torpedo seemed a damned sight lighter than when they took it out.
Without her torpedoes, the Kalvari will have no weapons to target enemy submarines.
The modern self-propelled torpedo, invented and improved in the last half of the nineteenth century by the Englishman Robert Whitehead, was naval warfare's first "fire and forget" weapon.